A man transforms his life and now uses fishing to keep teenagers away from violence

Every Saturday morning at Southside Park, the lake is lined with people eager to hit the big time. Teenagers like 14-year-old Termar Knox are also there. “If you take your time, you’ll catch something,” Knox said. He uses fishing to relax away from the dangers of the streets. “I don’t like gun violence at all,” he said. These streets are definitely trying to lure him in. “I wanted to make a change in my life so I had with Mr. Tim, because I know he’s that kind of person,” Knox said. Tim is Tim Poole, who was once young himself. “I wanted to have money and I wanted to have money fast, so what I ended up doing was selling drugs,” Poole said.He was definitely on the wrong track. “I did it by choice,” he said. “My father died when I was 9 and I had no real man to talk to. His drug dealing went terribly wrong. “I’m blessed to be alive,” he said. “There was no luck. I was shot five times with a gun. I was shot in the mouth.” When Poole was shot, he was on probation. At the time he recovered, he was sent back to jail and that’s where he decided to turn his life around. The only thing Poole is pushing now is teenage counseling. “I thought to myself, what can I do to stop this,” Poole said. “Hopefully one or two get the message I’m giving them.” Every Saturday morning on his show, Hooked on Fishing, Not on Violence, Poole takes teenagers fishing at the park. | VIDEO BELOW | Hooked On Fishing Not On Violence: Sacramento nonprofit hopes to teach patience to young adults “It helps me with my patience and it helps me with my maturity,” Yeshua says Awogbade, 14. on the street,” said AJ Jones, 12. It gives a new outlook on life. “It’s four fewer kids selling drugs. e in the neighborhood,” Knox said. “These are four children who change the world.” Poole, a disc jockey in his spare time, also uses his platform to host teen summits and roller skating events. There is a listing of events on his website Hooked on Fishing, Not on Violence. “We’re saving one life, one cast at a time,” he said. This story was produced as part of the CommUNITY: Saving Our Cities project. The series airs on KCRA 3 and online Monday through Friday throughout May each evening during the 6 p.m. news. We focus on those who work to make our communities safer and help our young people thrive, especially in neighborhoods facing social and economic disparities. Here are more stories from the Save Our Cities: The Real Crime series. Is it going up or down? The mother and father launch a scholarship in honor of their son killed in a shooting.

Every Saturday morning in Southside Park, the lake is lined with people eager to enjoy it.

Teenagers like Termar Knox, 14, are there too.

“If you take your time, you’ll catch something,” Knox said.

He uses fishing to relax away from the dangers of the streets.

“I don’t like gun violence at all,” he said.

These streets are definitely trying to lure him in.

“I wanted to make a change in my life, so I went with Mr. Tim, because I know he’s that kind of person,” Knox said.

Mr. Tim is Tim Poole, who was once young himself.

“I wanted to have money and I wanted to have money fast, so I ended up selling drugs,” Poole said.

He was probably on the wrong track.

“I did it by choice,” he said. “My dad died when I was 9 and I had no real man to talk to.”

This drug deal ended quickly in 1991 at the intersection of 2nd Avenue and 33rd Street. His drug deal went horribly wrong.

“I’m blessed to be alive,” he said. “There was no luck. I was shot five times with a gun. I was shot in the mouth.

When Poole was shot he was on probation. By the time he recovered, he was sent back to prison and it was there that he decided to change his life. The only thing Poole is pushing now is advice for teenagers.

“I thought to myself what can I do to stop this,” Poole said. “I hope one or two will understand the message I am giving them.”

Every Saturday morning, on his show Hooked on Fishing, Not on Violence, Poole has teenagers fishing at the park.

| VIDEO BELOW | Hooked On Fishing Not On Violence: Sacramento nonprofit hopes to teach young adults patience

“It helps me with my patience and it helps me with my maturity,” said 14-year-old Yeshua Awogbade.

“Keeping young people off the streets is very important,” said 12-year-old AJ Jones.

It is to take a new look at life.

“That’s four fewer kids selling drugs in the neighborhood,” Knox said. “These are four children who change the world.”

Poole, a disc jockey in his spare time, also uses his platform to host teen summits and roller skating events. There is a listing of events on his website Hooked on Fishing, Not on Violence.

“We are saving one life, one cast at a time,” he said.


This story was produced as part of the CommUNITY: Saving Our Cities project. The series airs on KCRA 3 and online Monday through Friday throughout May each evening during the 6 p.m. news. We focus on those who work to make our communities safer and help our young people thrive, especially in neighborhoods facing social and economic disparities.

Here are other stories from the Saving Our Cities series:

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